Sir George supports Cancer Research UK's Reducing the Risk Campaign
11 Jan 2005

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Along with other MPs, Sir George backed Cancer Research UK's new campaign 'Reduce the Risk'.

"This is a new cancer prevention awareness campaign, to improve public awareness of the avoidable risks for cancer and the importance of early detection. The campaign hopes to encourage cancer risk reduction in every day life, focusing on five important areas: smoking; weight control and physical activity; diet; sun exposure; and early detection."

"I believe MPs have a key role to play in developing policy that supports people who want to achieve a healthy lifestyle."


Cancer research UK Press Release

LOCAL MP SUPPORTS CANCER PREVENTION CAMPAIGN

ANDOVER MP, Sir George Young, got on his bike to raise awareness of the importance of exercise in reducing your cancer risk at the launch of a new landmark campaign from Cancer Research UK. The campaign, Reduce the Risk, aims to help people learn how lifestyle changes can dramatically alter their odds of being diagnosed with cancer.

Reduce the Risk launched with the news that over half of all cancers could be prevented by changes to lifestyle.

Sir George says: “I wholeheartedly support the work that Cancer Research UK is doing to raise awareness of the importance of lifestyle change in cancer prevention.

“Maintaining a healthy weight is an important way to help reduce your risk of cancer. Staying in shape doesn’t need to be expensive or time-consuming. Just 30 minutes five days a week of moderate exercise such as brisk walking, cycling, gardening or swimming will keep you healthy.”

The campaign focuses on five main areas: stopping smoking, staying in shape, eating and drinking healthily, being SunSmart and taking advantage of screening programmes.

Reduce the Risk was launched with a wide-ranging report showing that there is still confusion over what increases the risk of cancer, which is Britain’s biggest killer. The report, based on a survey of 4,000 people, revealed that two-thirds of people were unaware that being overweight or obese increases the risk of some cancers. The same number of people (67 per cent) didn’t know that a diet low in fruit and vegetables could increase their chance of getting the disease.

The good news is that the message that “smoking kills” has got through to most people, and the majority also knew that sunburn increases skin cancer risk.

Over the next five years the Reduce the Risk campaign will target thousands of GP’s surgeries, hospitals and health promotion units with leaflets and posters on its key messages. Information will also be available from local authority leisure centres, swimming pools and shopping centres.

The charity held a special launch for politicians and policy makers to explain the campaign and to call for coordinated action on all areas of the campaign.

Cancer Research UK’s Chief Executive, Professor Alex Markham says: “The fundamental aim of this campaign is to alert everyone to the fact that each one of us can reduce our risk of getting cancer. We estimate that half of all cancer cases could be prevented. There is no magic pill to prevent us getting the disease but there are many things we can all do in our daily lives to improve our chances of avoiding it.

ENDS


 
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