Climate Change lobby for Sir George
6 Nov 2010
Sir George in the Mayors Parlour in Andover's Guild Hall, with local campaigners
Sir George in the Mayors Parlour in Andover's Guild Hall, with local campaigners
Click for a full size picture
Supporters of Transition Town Andover came to Sir George's Advice Bureau at the Guildhall on Saturday to discuss with him some key environmental changes.

"We had an opportunity to discuss the Energy, Security & Green Economy Bill, which will help insulate the country's homes and put the UK on course for a low carbon economy".

Those present also raised with me support for Emissions Performance Standards for fossil fuel power stations, and pressed us to deliver on the recommendations of the Committee on Climate Change.

"I promised that I would write to Wendy Davis, who put together the meeting, giving the Government's response to the many issues that we covered. Concern was expressed that those on lower incomes should not suffer from fuel poverty; that minimum energy efficiency standards should be introduced for the private rented sector, and that there should be higher taxation on aircraft flights. I will be writing to Wendy in due course giving the response to the important issues that were raised".


Below is a summary of the group's agenda:

The Big Climate Connection:
Policy Asks
The world needs a global solution to the climate change problem: a solution that is best
delivered by a fair, ambitious and binding agreement under the United Nations. The UK could
and should deliver real leadership: leading by example to deliver on a low carbon economy at
home, and leading in the global negotiations to push for richer countries to provide support for
action in developing countries.
In the next few months there are two key opportunities for MPs to influence the global and
domestic climate change agenda: the Energy Security and Green Economy Bill, and the UN
Climate Conference in Cancun.
1. Energy Security and Green Economy Bill.
The Energy Security and Green Economy Bill will be the first opportunity for the new Parliament
to pass significant legislation to put the UK on course for a low carbon transition. In order to
meet the carbon targets set out in the Climate Change Act, the UK must massively improve
energy efficiency, and clean up the power sector.
Summary of policy asks
Nationally – Include in the Energy Security and Green Economy Bill:
• A strong Green Deal to ensure that by 2020 7 million homes in the UK have had an
energy efficiency makeover, reducing their emissions by at least 60 per cent.
• Minimum energy efficiency standards for the private rented sector so that by 2016 the
most unhealthy homes (below Band F and G) cannot be let.
• Enabling legislation so a strong Emissions Performance Standard (EPS) for fossil fuel
power stations can be set to enable delivery of a decarbonised electricity supply by 2030.
Internationally – at the Cancun International Climate talks in December the UK must:
• Support the establishment of one common climate fund to help developing countries
adapt to climate change, develop in a low carbon way and protect their forests.
• Support and champion new and innovative sources of public climate finance, including
revenue from measures to tackle aviation and shipping emissions, and a levy on financial
transactions.
• Guarantee that UK money for adaptation in developing countries will be provided as
grants rather than loans, and push other donors to do likewise.
A Green Deal for homes
More than a quarter of the UK’s carbon emissions result from the energy we use in our homes.
Improving the energy efficiency of the UK’s homes will cut the number of premature winter
deaths, tackle fuel poverty, reduce the UK’s dependency on gas imports, make meeting the
UK’s Renewable Energy targets more affordable, and create local jobs. We need a strong
Green Deal programme to make this a reality.
The Energy Security and Green Economy Bill should include:
• A strong Green Deal using the pay as you save approach and other supportive
measures to ensure that by 2020 7 million homes in the UK have had an energy
efficiency makeover, reducing their emissions by at least 60 per cent, and that no homes
are left below an energy rating of Band D.
• Minimum energy efficiency standards for the private rented sector so that by 2016 the
most unhealthy homes (below Band F and G) cannot be let.
A clean power sector
The UK has a very poor record on renewable power. Due to a bias in favour of dirty fossil fuels
the power sector is responsible for around a third of the UK’s emissions. To meet our climate
targets, we must decarbonise this sector. Because the power stations and transmission lines
that deliver electricity to us last for decades, we need to get going on this transformation as
quickly as possible, increasing our use of wind, solar and wave energy, and phasing out the
dirtiest fuels immediately.
The first step is to make sure that there are rules to limit the carbon emissions of power stations,
ensuring they are as efficient as possible. Otherwise we could lock ourselves into polluting
power for decades to come.
The Energy Security and Green Economy Bill should include:
• Enabling legislation so a strong Emissions Performance Standard (EPS) for fossil fuel
power stations can be set to enable delivery of a decarbonised electricity supply by
2030.
Although the coalition government has committed to introduce an EPS, it is not currently
included in the Energy Security and Green Economy Bill. While the detail of such a policy
should be considered alongside other energy market reforms, introducing enabling legislation in
the bill would mean that the Government’s commitment can be implemented without further
legislative delay, while details could be covered in secondary legislation or regulations.
2. UN Climate Conference in Cancun, Mexico. 29 Nov – 10 Dec 2010.
The UK has played a leadership role in global climate initiatives and it is important for us to
maintain this tradition in the international community. The climate change talks taking place in
Cancun this year are a crucial opportunity on the path towards an ambitious, fair and binding
global deal on climate change. After slow progress in Copenhagen, this year’s talks must build
international trust in the process towards a comprehensive deal, including progress towards
binding emissions cuts and agreeing steps that ensure delivery of long term financing.
In Copenhagen last year governments promised to deliver $100bn per year by 2020 to help
developing countries adapt to climate change and enable them to develop on a low carbon path.
Whilst this figure represents just half of the estimated amount of public finance needed to meet
the scale of the challenge, it’s an important first step and it’s now essential to ensure that this
money delivers for the world’s poorest people.
Progress on financing is key to rebuilding trust and ensuring a successful global deal, so when
Chris Huhne travels to Mexico this winter he must:
• Support the establishment of one common climate fund to help developing countries
adapt to climate change, develop in a low carbon way and protect their forests. This fund
should be under the authority of the UN (such as that of the UN Adaptation Fund),
should have equitable representation of developed and developing countries, and should
protect the rights of poor people to sustainable development.
• Support and champion new and innovative sources of finance, including revenue from
measures to tackle aviation and shipping emissions, and a levy on financial transactions
because these public funds can leverage the trillions of dollars of private finance
needed.
• Reinforce the UK’s integrity in climate negotiations by guaranteeing that UK money
going towards the costs of adaptation by developing countries will be provided as grants
rather than loans, and push other donors to do likewise.
 
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